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Change

ChangeReal change – can it ever be a political election possibility?

A poster I saw from time to time in April 2010, related to the (then-impending) general election, was for the Conservative (Tory) party – it recommended voting (by means of voting Conservative) for Change.

What change, I wonder, did it have in mind, and just what kind of change may politics, and choice of political parties, be able to bring about?

Of course, the word has been used as part of political slogans for some time (did not Barack Obama put such a prospect before the American people in the run-up to the 2008 election there?).

Of course, a majority vote for the Conservative party would have brought about a change of government from the (previous) Labour administration; but could it have brought a fundamental change in Britain, or British society, or in the kind of life we live, and the values, assumptions, and preoccupations upon which our society is ordered?

All the evidence suggested the contrary, and – despite the efforts of the parties to convince us otherwise, at that time – the difference between them all was, and still is, very slight.

They are all committed in some degree or another to Britain’s membership of the European Community, they all, in truth (despite a few promises to change the permitted dates) believe in abortion, and they all subscribe very enthusiastically to that other aspect of the Culture of Death, the promotion of homosexual practices (as in Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg’s dangerously-erroneous remark that homosexuality was “normal and harmless”, and the sacking of a Christian Conservative candidate, in Scotland, who dared to question his party’s pro-homosexualist orthodoxy).

These three things, and others, would not have changed, whoever had won the election (and nobody did), nor are they likely to change in the foreseeable future, under the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition.

Why is this matter being raised on a website defending orthodox Christianity? For the simple reason that these very basic matters, about the nature and direction of our society, all hinge on the fact that its ruler ship, and Establishment at all levels, has not only turned its back on our Judeo-Christian culture and its values, but worse, that in truth the real values of our rulers and politicians – all of them – consist, to a greater or lesser extent, of the pursuit of materialism.

Where there is no vision the people perish, and where rulers see all of life and society in purely-this-worldly terms, the capacity to value people for themselves (and not for any power/influence or wealth they may have) inevitably diminishes – and we saw the result of this despising in Labour leader Gordon Brown’s unguarded remarks concerning Gillian Duffy (a former-Labour supporter) in Rochdale (whom he called a “bigoted woman”).

The moment human existence is seen as a brief, purposeless affair, brought about by chance and accident, then individuals – and, thence, people as a whole – matter only for the power they are able to wield, that is, their power over others.

Once we discount the idea of an ultimate consequence to any human action beyond the capacity of pressure groups and power-brokers to subvert, and accept the notion that ethical laws are purely-human and relative, then the idea that human deeds and activities bear a moral dimension inevitably, despite pretences, fades.

The logic of the process of amorality, hedonism, and death, becomes unavoidable.

Real change would involve changing not just the values and concerns of those in power, but of elevating the ultimate nature and purpose of human existence to being the first concern of leaders (in the many pre-election televised debates, we heard much about the economy, jobs and services (health, education); these are important, but ultimately they are second-order issues; those which precede them, and should be first and foremost – from which all others, and their answers, flow – were barely mentioned).

The Culture of Death is all around us (the Blair/Brown governments saw to that), but it was kept firmly in the box when the electioneering leaders were speaking.

The only real change would be a change of human nature, and that cannot come about in this lifetime/society.

But that fact does not mean that politicians have to retreat into illusions about humans and human society. If they accept reality as it is, then there is hope, if they do not, then there is no hope at all. Acceptance of reality is acceptance of the way we are, and the ordering of the world on those terms.